How a hospital in Portland is treating addiction in a way it has never been

December 18, 2018 in Addiction, Drug Addiction, Substance Abuse

Healthcare centers in the United States have been fiercely trying to reinvent their ways to help patients overcome addiction. Over the past few years, one such hospital that has made meaningful strides in this regard is the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) located in Portland, Oregon. According to a study published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine, the medical staff of the infirmary has completely changed the way they view and address addiction.

Honora Englander, an assistant professor of medicine at OHSU observed that patients seeking medical intervention for a complication arising out of substance abuse would come back months after their discharge to seek treatment for another complication. This cycle would continue and finally, end with the death of the patient.

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 Surplus production of marijuana leads to proliferation of black marketing in Oregon

April 03, 2018 in Drug Addiction

With the legalization of marijuana, there have been reports about the lack of marijuana supply in the state of Oregon. However, according to Billy Williams, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, the state is producing three times more marijuana than it can consume. Despite the legalization of recreational marijuana in the state, the selling of cannabis to other states remains illegal, thus creating a “formidable” amount of the drug in the black market. This way, it is also defeating the primary objective of the legalization of marijuana.

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 Treating addiction through neuro-feedback mechanism

March 20, 2018 in Drug Addiction

Research has long proven that addiction is not an outcome of a weak will power or moral failing. Rather, a chronic medical condition, it occurs due to changes in the brain from consuming certain substances of abuse. Breaking free from opioid addiction takes much more than willpower. Once an addiction is formed, escaping from its vicious hold is not easy. Attempts to stop using it creates intensely unpleasant symptoms that people will do anything to avoid.

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 Drug traffickers using innovative ways to evade border security

January 10, 2018 in Addiction, Blog, Drug Addiction, Substance Abuse

Even though the United States spend billions of dollars to stop illegal drugs coming in from the Mexican border, traffickers have been exploiting the weak spots in the customs and immigration system. Drug cartels are now using innovative methods to carry on their business after the federal government started using drones, sensors, cameras and other technologies to curb the illegal activity on the border.

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 Nutritional requirements during addiction recovery

August 08, 2017 in Addiction, Drug Abuse, Drug Addiction, Substance Abuse

Coming clean about an addiction and resolving to seek treatment can be a life-altering decision. As long as one is associated with a rehab center for treatment, immense support is available through skilled professionals and other facilities. However, at the end of the treatment when an individual is on his own, the timeline of his or her sobriety depends on how strong is his will power to remain sober, conquer cravings and practice extreme self-care. One of the key factors facilitating sobriety is diet.

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 False advertisements fail to nail real repercussions of synthetic marijuana

August 04, 2017 in Drug Abuse, Drug Addiction, Marijuana

Fake weed, also known as synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) or synthetic marijuana, is an artificially created psychotropic chemical that primarily aims at enhancing and mimicking the hallucinatory effects of marijuana. Although manufacturers claim that the ingredients of SCBs are natural and extracted from various plants, the only thing natural about SCBs is the dried plant on which a number of chemicals are applied. Reportedly, these chemicals cause some debilitating symptoms once taken into the body.

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 As Florida’s opioid crisis worsens, concern over new drug laws rises

August 01, 2017 in Drug Abuse, Drug Addiction, Opioids

The Florida Medical Examiner Commission’s 2016 Interim Drugs in Deceased Persons Report has identified fentanyl as the drug responsible for the highest number of overdose deaths in the state during the first six months of 2016. The report, released in May 2017, presents the most recent and accurate summary of Florida’s lethal opioid crisis. The first half of 2016 saw 704 deaths due to fentanyl overdoses, which is nearly the same as the total number of fentanyl overdose deaths during 2015.

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 Mix music with feelings, not with substance abuse

July 06, 2017 in Drug Abuse, Drug Addiction, Substance Abuse

There is a close association between music and drugs. In fact, taste for a particular genre of music shapes a person’s social and personal behavior, such as sense of dressing, visiting certain pubs, inclination toward certain drugs, etc. Therefore, the kind of music a person prefers to listen in daily life immensely affects his or her personality.

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 Alaska Governor taking initiatives to combat opioid abuse

June 08, 2017 in Drug Addiction, Opioids

The United States has been witnessing a rise in episodes of opioid abuse that has resulted in an epidemic situation across various parts of the country. Countless propositions have been put forth to curtail the rising opioid crisis stemming from misuse or overdose of prescription medications. In February 2017, the Alaska Governor, Bill Walker, announced a disaster declaration on the state’s opioid condition. The administrative order aims to address the issue of opioid epidemic similar to previous orders dealing with natural disasters and related problems.

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 Rarely abused drugs – 4: Rohypnol

May 29, 2017 in Addiction, Drug Addiction, Synthetic Drugs

Historically, people have been using a plethora of drugs to get the feelings of euphoria or change the way they feel. People get hooked on to a variety of drugs, be it illegal ones like cocaine, heroin or marijuana or legal substances such as tobacco or alcohol. However, there are individuals who use medicines that are used to treat illness as a drug of abuse. While most people get addicted to commonly available prescription drugs such as opioids (pain relievers), central nervous system (CNS) depressants and stimulants, there are many people whose life revolves around some of the rare medications which though less common or unheard of, can produce a similar “paralyzing” effect.

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