FDA and FTC issue warning letters to CBD-manufacturing companies making false claims

September 04, 2019 in Addiction, Marijuana, Substance Abuse

Recently, three companies marketing cannabidiol (CBD) products were issued warning letters by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) against making false claims that their CBD-infused products were useful in the treatment of diseases like fibromyalgia, neuropsychiatric disorder, Alzheimer’s, and cancer without adequate evidence. The companies which received these letters from the agencies were Nutra Pure, PotNetwork Holdings, and Advanced Spine and Pain.

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 New Year’s resolutions for those in recovery

January 02, 2019 in Addiction, Therapy, Treatment

New Year’s is a time to reflect and make new goals for the coming days. However, a majority of people do not succeed in reaching their goals because they do not make definitive resolutions. For someone in recovery, this is an extremely important time. Either one can make realistic resolutions and walk the path of lasting sobriety or one can make unrealistic resolutions and set the stage for disaster.

People in recovery must remember that they were brave to have reached where they are. They can further build on their achievements by making a few resolutions associated with lifelong sobriety and sticking by them. Some of these resolutions can be:

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 How a hospital in Portland is treating addiction in a way it has never been

December 18, 2018 in Addiction, Drug Addiction, Substance Abuse

Healthcare centers in the United States have been fiercely trying to reinvent their ways to help patients overcome addiction. Over the past few years, one such hospital that has made meaningful strides in this regard is the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) located in Portland, Oregon. According to a study published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine, the medical staff of the infirmary has completely changed the way they view and address addiction.

Honora Englander, an assistant professor of medicine at OHSU observed that patients seeking medical intervention for a complication arising out of substance abuse would come back months after their discharge to seek treatment for another complication. This cycle would continue and finally, end with the death of the patient.

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 Sun Life Financial sets a precedent by covering medical marijuana in Canada

July 06, 2018 in Cannabis Use Disorder

Sun Life Financial Inc., a Toronto-based insurer, has taken a groundbreaking decision to include medical marijuana coverage as an option for its group benefits plans in Canada. The initiative will certainly set a precedent for other insurers.

Sun Life, which provides health benefits coverage to over 3 million Canadians and their families, started providing coverage for medical marijuana ranging from $1,500 to $6,000 per individual per year from Mar. 1, 2018. The Sun Life plan members must meet specific criteria to qualify for the coverage. They need an authorization letter from their physician and should be registered with a medical marijuana producer licensed with Health Canada. Moreover, it will be available only for specific symptoms related to cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and palliative care.

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 Ohio finds it tough to fill vacant job positions due to rampant opioid addiction

June 08, 2018 in Addiction

The opioid epidemic in the United States is not only affecting the mental health of the people, but also taking a heavy toll on the country’s economy. According to business leaders, many positions in various department are vacant or suffering, as workers are caught in addiction. Ohio is one of the states where the situation is grim. In spite of measures taken by the Trump administration, the manufacturing industry in the state has recorded a stunted growth primarily because of opioid use disorder (OUD). Ohio businesses are turning away job applicants due to their addiction.

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 New Jersey to review medical marijuana program to expand cannabis access to patients

May 01, 2018 in Marijuana

Governor Phil Murphy has called for a 60-day review of New Jersey’s medical marijuana program. Terming it constrained and limited, he promised to make it more inclusive by expanding access to more patients. The governor feels that the current programs are creating unnecessary problems in accessing care for patients, which has been confirmed by the medical marijuana advocates as well. Rather than bringing people in its fold, it has been alleged that it fails to meet the immediate needs of the patients.

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 DEA temporarily places fentanyl-related substances in Schedule I

April 13, 2018 in Drug Abuse

To avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has issued a temporary scheduling order of fentanyl-related substances in Schedule I in the United States. Currently, they are not placed in any schedule of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Substances placed under the Schedule I have a high potential for abuse, lack safety for use and have no accepted medical use in treatment. In addition to the above stringent measure, the order will also schedule the isomers, esters, ethers, salts and salts of isomers, etc. of fentanyl-related substances in Schedule I. 

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 Surplus production of marijuana leads to proliferation of black marketing in Oregon

April 03, 2018 in Drug Addiction

With the legalization of marijuana, there have been reports about the lack of marijuana supply in the state of Oregon. However, according to Billy Williams, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, the state is producing three times more marijuana than it can consume. Despite the legalization of recreational marijuana in the state, the selling of cannabis to other states remains illegal, thus creating a “formidable” amount of the drug in the black market. This way, it is also defeating the primary objective of the legalization of marijuana.

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 Treating addiction through neuro-feedback mechanism

March 20, 2018 in Drug Addiction

Research has long proven that addiction is not an outcome of a weak will power or moral failing. Rather, a chronic medical condition, it occurs due to changes in the brain from consuming certain substances of abuse. Breaking free from opioid addiction takes much more than willpower. Once an addiction is formed, escaping from its vicious hold is not easy. Attempts to stop using it creates intensely unpleasant symptoms that people will do anything to avoid.

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 NY Senator Schumer calls for more federal funds to combat opioid epidemic

March 06, 2018 in Opioids

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand recently announced $132,899 as federal funding to combat the opioid crisis in Allegany, Cattaraugus and Chautauqua counties of New York. The grant, given under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Rural Development Distance Learning and Telemedicine program, will aid in improving emergency response to opioid overdoses in the Southern Tier Region to promote a distance-learning program in the region.

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